The Rules - your opinion, suggestion

  • Things a setter can and cannot do?

    When I read the rules (which I'm admittedly not good at), I believe this is true:

    1. If a setter starts a play in the back row she is prohibited from doing a set dump, blocking, or attacking an overpass.

    I assume the setter must adhere to rules pertaining to any back row player with regards to attacking--which is sending the ball in the direction of the opponent--and touching the ball when it's completely higher than the net. The blocking prohibition is less clear but I think it's a no-no.

    • What about if she starts the play in the back row, comes to the front to set the ball, does a jump set and touches the ball before any part of the ball has gotten lower than the top of the net?

    That seems unfair to Russians and other tall people. Who is in a position to make a call on that?


    Background on why I'm asking:


    There was a recent Korean Kerfuffle where a ref's decision was reviewed and he was fined for making a bad call. Here's a screen shot of the critical moment but don't try and judge anything from this angle. I only post it for a visual reference. The ref called Su-ji (in blue, on the left) for a reaching foul.


    It's not clear to me if the review committee said:

    • "No, the correct call is that Hye-Jin (in white on the right) committed a net fault"

    Or did they say:

    • "Since Hye-Jin started the play in the back row she's got no business touching the ball above the net like that"

    That is the question. Can a setter who started in the back row touch the ball above the net as Hye-Jin is doing in the screen shot above as long as it isn't an attack?





    You can watch the play here--it's queued up: 2:29:17

  • That is the question. Can a setter who started in the back row touch the ball above the net as Hye-Jin is doing in the screen shot above as long as it isn't an attack?

    Yes she can, only attacking and blocking is not allowed. The call you refer to was saying that the block player was reaching over the net, i.e. interfering with the (legal) set. I have no idea why the referee would be fined for that because he can surely call it in this situation. Maybe whoever reviewed it said that the ball was right over the middle of the net, so both players were allowed to play at and he shouldn't have interfered at all. Another referee might as well have decided against the setter for reaching over the net, those situations always are very close and hard to decide.

  • Maybe whoever reviewed it said that the ball was right over the middle of the net, so both players were allowed to play at and he shouldn't have interfered at all.

    Thanks. I hadn't thought of that angle. That would have been the best call, as the ball was still playable.


    It turned out kind of tragic for Su-ji's team who went on to lose after being up 12-9, 13-10 in the Tie-Break, with strong impact on their race down the final stretch of the season.


    Sometimes when you get stirred up you forget how to finish

  • I would to see the two handed spike slam stopped. This is only when spiking, not when someone is blocking at the net or jousting (both players jump to block). Having seen Kliuka’s slam dunk, even announcers thought it was a carry. If you use two hands on a spike attempt the ball has got to go upwards.

  • I would to see the two handed spike slam stopped. This is only when spiking, not when someone is blocking at the net or jousting (both players jump to block). Having seen Kliuka’s slam dunk, even announcers thought it was a carry. If you use two hands on a spike attempt the ball has got to go upwards.

    I want to go even further. These days there isn't difference between tipped ball and throwed ball (one hand tip). IMO referees are to loose regarding to this.

  • FIVB announced a new rule testing.

    If a player/coach/team member will receive a red card, then additional one action will be played. Opponent team (not this one which got red card) will choose, do they want to serve or receive. If a team which got red card will win this one game, then there is no point awarded for anyone. But if opponent (team which didn't get red card) will win this, then they will get one point. Video verification will be also allowed in "red card" actions.

    This rule will be tested in upcoming club season in Russia.

  • FIVB announced a new rule testing.

    If a player/coach/team member will receive a red card, then additional one action will be played. Opponent team (not this one which got red card) will choose, do they want to serve or receive. If a team which got red card will win this one game, then there is no point awarded for anyone. But if opponent (team which didn't get red card) will win this, then they will get one point. Video verification will be also allowed in "red card" actions.

    This rule will be tested in upcoming club season in Russia.

    This is a dumb test. The player or team violated the rules of the sport, but if they win the next point, they are not penalized. Just dumb.

  • If I'm being honest, some of American setters, their sets look like carry to me, the ball stays too long in their hands, but refs don't think so.

    This is a philosophical question, how much time is required for the ball to be in any player’s hand? in FIVB rules, an amount of time in not listed, nor could anyone calculate in the middle of play in their head.

  • I would to see the two handed spike slam stopped. This is only when spiking, not when someone is blocking at the net or jousting (both players jump to block). Having seen Kliuka’s slam dunk, even announcers thought it was a carry. If you use two hands on a spike attempt the ball has got to go upwards.

    I personally don`t see anything wrong with that....it is the same act when you have a overpass on the net and the middle blocker ( or anyone else on the net) just put it down.